Paths to Literacy

for students who are blind or visually impaired

Best Read-Alouds

I am looking for the best read-aloud books for students who are blind.   I work with students who have delayed language and are non-readers.  Talking squirrels and wizards need not apply :)  Looking for real-world stuff. Thanks!

Read aloud books

Comments

More information?

Posted by Charlotte Cushman

This is a great question that many people have.  Can you tell us a bit more about what you're looking for?  Is this for a particular student or just a general question?  What age is the student?  What are the student's interests?  Are there any books that you have found that the student likes?  If you could let us know some of those things, we can give you a more specific list.

I am also wondering if you have tried story boxes and creating experience books, as these are both wonderful ways to get students who are blind interested in books and literacy experiences.

 

Suggested literacy activities

Posted by Charlotte Cushman

Thanks for giving a bit more information.  My recommendation would be to start with story boxes, where you have assembled real objects to illustrate the ideas or events in a book.  I think that will indeed help to convince them that books are fun!  Here are some ideas that are on this site already:

Story Box for The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Lunch Crunch Story Box

Little Rabbit's Bedtime

All You Need for a Snowman

These are geared toward younger children, but the use of real objects and the chance to role play or extend the story with other activities can make them good choices for students at any age.

Have you tried having them write experience stories about some of the things that they like, such as trampolines?

A good place to get ideas about experience books is here:

Giving My Son Opportunities to Share: How to Create an Experience Book

Linda Hagood wrote a great blog post about this too:  Play-Based Experience Stories

I hope this helps with your students.  Please let us know how things go!

Charlotte

 

Collage of Best Read-Aloud Books

Previous comments for Best Read-Alouds

Charlotte@Perkins commented on October 3, 2014

Thanks for giving a bit more information.  My recommendation would be to start with story boxes, where you have assembled real objects to illustrate the ideas or events in a book.  I think that will indeed help to convince them that books are fun!  Here are some ideas that are on this site already:

Story Box for The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Lunch Crunch Story Box

Little Rabbit's Bedtime

All You Need for a Snowman

These are geared toward younger children, but the use of real objects and the chance to role play or extend the story with other activities can make them good choices for students at any age.

Have you tried having them write experience stories about some of the things that they like, such as trampolines?

A good place to get ideas about experience books is here:

Giving My Son Opportunities to Share: How to Create an Experience Book

Linda Hagood wrote a great blog post about this too:  Play-Based Experience Stories

I hope this helps with your students.  Please let us know how things go!

Charlotte

 

Collage of Best Read-Aloud Books

Deedra commented on October 2, 2014

Here is some follow-up information regarding my earlier post about read Aloud Books:

This school year, I took job teaching a group of 5 students between 8-10 years old; 2 girls and 3 boys; all totally blind; very limited commication/language skills (including lots of echolalia!). They each have a few limited and rigid interests, examples: jumping on  trampoline, cereal, different flavors of yogurt, band-aids, bead neckaces. I would like to find books that I could read to them about real-world things that I could reinforce with concrete objects for them to explore, ask them questions about, and have them (hopefully, one day, spontaneously) comment on. We have made tactile books with each of them, but I have yet to convince them books are fun. Also, trying to keep things age-appropriate while balancing that with their language/literacy skills. Thanks so much.  I visit your site all the time.

Charlotte@Perkins commented on October 2, 2014

This is a great question that many people have.  Can you tell us a bit more about what you're looking for?  Is this for a particular student or just a general question?  What age is the student?  What are the student's interests?  Are there any books that you have found that the student likes?  If you could let us know some of those things, we can give you a more specific list.

I am also wondering if you have tried story boxes and creating experience books, as these are both wonderful ways to get students who are blind interested in books and literacy experiences.