Paths to Literacy

for students who are blind or visually impaired

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Deafblind Strategies

Below are strategies posts related to Deafblindness.



Turkey tail feathers

Thanksgiving Feathers: A Creative Writing Assignment

This creative writing assignment was done by a 4th grader, who is deafblind. He's quite proud of it and we're happy to share it here!
A boy who is deafblind uses an abacus with his interpreter

Using an Abacus with a Child Who Is Deafblind

These videos demonstrate the use of an abacus to solve addition and subtraction problems with a student who is deafblind with an interpreter using tactile sign, braille, and a teacher.
Tactile cane on page of book

Creating a Book for a Braille Reader with CVI: Max and His Cane

This simple braille book tells the story about an 8-year-old boy who loses his cane. The colored illustrations are appealing for children with CVI.
Independent exercise sheet

Wellness Program for Youth Who Are Deafblind

Incorporate literacy skills into a wellness program for students with deafblindness or multiple disabilities.
A boy reads his braille calendar on the wall.

Tracking Reading Homework

Make your reading calendar accessible to braille users with these ideas!
Tactile Valentine post box

Creating an Accessible Valentine's Day Post Box

Make Valentine's Day accessible to children who are blind, deafblind, visually impaired or multiply disabled with accessible post boxes!
close up of the volcano project with the vocabulary cards around it

Volcanoes!: Making Science Accessible to Children Who Are Deafblind

This volcano assignment shows how to make science accessible to students who are deafblind.
different textures represent different layers of the Earth

Layers of the Earth Tactile Graphics

Tactile graphics with braille labels help to make a science activity about the layers of the Earth accessible to students who are blind, deafblind or visually impaired.
a baby owl on a dirt path

Owl Babies Story Box

Create a storybox about Owl Babies for children who are deafblind, blind or visually impaired, including those with multiple disabilities.
Liam reading the name tags on the organization bench

Organizing Bench to Promote Independent Living Skills

Promote independent living skills and braille literacy through an organizer bench at home or school
Cover of The Beach

Providing Direct Experience to Develop Concepts

Children with visual impairments and other special needs need to develop an understanding of basic concepts in order to grasp meaning in books.
A boy reads a braille grocery list on magnetic strips

Magnetic Braille Grocery List

Promote braille literacy, as well as independent living skills, by creating a magnetic grocery list.
Writing experience book in braille

Braille Book about Deaf Camp Experience

A boy who is deafblind creates his own experience book about his time at Deaf Camp this summer.
Red cup and yellow washcloth

Using Tangible Symbols at Home

Guidelines to use object symbols at home with children who are blind, deafblind or visually impaired with additional disabilities (VIMD)
Liam feeling the word "love" in braille on the new bench

Woodwork and Braille

Incorporate braille into your home, both indoors and out!
the cover of a tactile book showing a picture of a girl wearing a winter coat and hat and the title Analelia Likes

Tactile Alphabet Book

A parent shares tips to make your own tactile books at home!
Lazy Susan with braille labels

Spin and Move!

This game provides practice matching textures, objects, and braille words. Kids will enjoy reading braille labels and performing the action movements on the card!
Liam and heart book

Valentine's Day Fun for Children who are Blind and Their Siblings!

Here are some Valentine's Day activities to do with children who are blind or visually impaired and their siblings!
a flip book next to a Superman action figure

Tactile Superhero Book

Make your own braille tactile book about superheroes for children who are blind, deafblind or low vision.
Modified Candy Land pieces

Adapting Candy Land for Players Who Are Blind or Deafblind

Adapt Candyland for players who are blind, low vision or deafblind! Just add braille and tactile symbols for an accessible and inclusive game.

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