Paths to Literacy

for students who are blind or visually impaired

Braille American Flag for the 4th of July!

American flag

In honor of Independence Day, we invite you to make the American Flag in braille with your children or students.  This braille art was created and developed by Jacqueline Goodstall.  

According to Axel and Levent (2003) the benefits of participating in art activities, for students who blind or visually impaired, include increased braille reading skills, mobility and map-reading skills, tactile exploration skills and development of texture sensitivity, socialization skills and greater self-esteem, and integration into the local community through participation in community art related activities. Additionally, “art making is a fun and interactive way for children to express themselves and to become familiar with the creative processes…” (Axel and Levent, 2003, p. 306).

Braille Art is a creative way for students who are blind or visually impaired to gain hand and finger strength, to increase finger dexterity, to develop tactual sensitivity, and to practice the Braille code. Additionally, Braille Art provides students who are blind or visually impaired an opportunity to share artwork with peers, exchange ideas, and develop a sense of accomplishment. These positive interactions are key in encouraging students who are blind or visually impaired to participate equally with others and thus, enhancing their sense of self-worth.  

Reference:

Axel, E. S. and Levent, N.S. (Eds.) (2003). Art beyond sight: A resource guide to art creativity, and visual impairment. New York: AFB Press.

 

Braille Art: 4th of July United States Flag

Teacher will provide “Fun Facts” about the components of the United States Flag:

The Thirteen Stripes: the U.S. Flag has thirteen stripes, alternating red (Braille letter g) and white (blank spaces between Braille letter g), and each stripe represents one of the 13 original colonies of England.

The 50 Stars: the United States Flag has 50 stars, one for each state of the Union. The last star added was for the State of Hawaii in 1960.

Teacher will have the student count the number of stars and stripes once the student has brailled the flag.

 

Braille Art Directions: Works best on an 8x11 sheet of Braille paper.

If student is giving this to another student as a “Greeting Card,” Braille the name of the recipient after the word Dear, Braille Happy 4th of July or Happy Flag Day, and Braille the name of the sender after the word From.

Start on Line Two

Row One

Braille the Word- Dear and the name of the recipient

Skip Row Two

Row Three

Braille the Words- Happy 4th of July or Happy Flag Day

Skip Row Four

Row Five

Braille the Word- From and the name of the recipient

Skip Rows Six and Seven

Row Eight

Cells 1-5: Braille Dots 1, 6

Cell 6: Braille Dot 1

Cell 7-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5

Row Nine

Cells 1-5: Braille Dots 1, 6

Cell 6: Braille Dot 1

Cell 7-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5

Row Ten

Cells 1-5: Braille Dots 1, 6

Cell 6: Braille Dot 1

Cell 7-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5

Row Eleven

Cells 1-5: Braille Dots 1, 6

Cell 6: Braille Dot 1

Cell 7-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5

Row Twelve

Cells 1-6: Braille Dot 1

Cells 7-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5

Rows Thirteen and Fourteen

Cells 1-22: Braille Dots 1, 2, 4, 5  

*****agggggggggggggggg

*****agggggggggggggggg

*****agggggggggggggggg

*****agggggggggggggggg

aaaaaagggggggggggggggg

gggggggggggggggggggggg

gggggggggggggggggggggg  

 

Click here to download a .pdf of these directions.

 

American Flag collage

Collage of the American Flag


 

Attached Files: 

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