Paths to Literacy

for students who are blind or visually impaired

Adapting Candy Land for Players Who Are Blind or Deafblind

Modified Candy Land pieces
We adapted the game Candy Land so that it would be accessible for my son Liam (age 7, deafblind).  It was easy to do, but took some time to add the modifications.  We attached velcro to the all of the squares using superglue and also to the game markers. The reason for the velcro is so that Liam would be able to feel where everyone was at on the game board without all of the pieces falling over.  We added the braille initial of all of the color spaces and to the playing cards as well (for example:  "g" for green and "b' for blue).  So that Liam could tell "who was who" for the game markers, we attached small wooden shapes onto them.  

Materials: 

  • Candy Land Game board and pieces 
  • Small wooden shapes (to glue onto the game markers)
  • Velcro pieces
  • Super Glue
  • Braille labels 
  • Small container to hold the cards 

Candy Land board with braille   Adapted piece on game board

 

Procedure: 

Liam was able to pass the small container around to each of the players on their turn, so that he could feel them choosing a card and get to feel what color they picked.  He was able to feel the players move their pieces as well.  I was so thrilled to see that Liam enjoyed playing Candy Land with his family and friends.  I loved that he was able to be included and the game was accessible to him!  

Adapted game cards  Adapted ice cream card

Collage for adapting Candy Land

Comments

candyland game

Posted by Betty

I am like wow this is so great I am very very happy to hear and see that parents take time to figure out how can one's child play with family and friends. This idea is terrific.

Resources

Posted by Kim Schildbach

Hello Liam's mom! I love reading your posts because our Anelia (age 8) is also functioning as deaf blind (she has hearing in her left ear and limited in her right). She was adopted almost 3 years ago from a very hard place and has suffered and is considered "globally delayed." I am trying hard to become more proficient in sign because she loves it (tactically)! What resources helped you learn? Thank you so much! Keep writing!

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