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Activity and strategy

Developing a Bond: Getting to Know Our Students

TVI Liz Eagan shares an idea for how she gets to know her students and create a bond with them.

Recently I added a high school student to my caseload. I work with the academic junior twice a week. As you can imagine, he is not the most excited about this new adjustment to his schedule. 

We are taking a break from the academic goals right now to get to know each other. I found this great site that had 100 Get to Know You Questions.  I copied them into a Google doc and edited some of the questions to meet my needs (e.g. changed “work” to “school”).  He has opened up more and is more animated as he answers the questions. I have learned a lot about him and his interests, which will help me once we start working on those goals again. I also answer the questions. He answers first and I answer second. We have learned we have a lot in common as well. I’ve been typing his answers in the Google doc so as we move forward, I can refer back to his responses to help plan my lessons. 

I’ve found that even though I edited the questions before asking them, I’m editing them again once I am face-to-face with the student again.  Here is my current list:

List of Getting to Know You questions

Download the list in Word format.

I’ve always asked some of these questions, but not all. I’m thinking this is going to start being a fall activity with some of my older students…even the ones I do know…or think I know.

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