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Activity and strategy

Feelings Book

This Feelings Book can help students who are blind or visually impaired to write about topics and emotions that may be challenging for them.

Often times students with visual impairments may have difficulty expressing their feelings or be overly sensitive. What may be perceived as acting out behaviors, may simply be a non-understanding of the situation. While working in Building on Patterns Curriculum Kindergarten level, this became evident. Lesson 8 has a poem about crying in it. 8 short lines, but my student was in tears by the end of the 3rd line. Lesson 15 had a short story “Finding a New Way” where the children get lost. Again, before I could finish the story, my student was in tears.
 
As a result, I created the feelings book. Since my student is a print reader learning braille, I decided to let her do the book in print since it was an uncomfortable topic we were discussing.
  • On each page invite the student to list his or her things that go with each of the feelings.
  • Talk about the feelings and what the student writes. 
  • Add pages to the book as the feeling comes up. Recently my student was worried about something so we added the worry page.  
  • I’ve scanned her responses and shared them with her educational team which includes the parent. I put little dots by each of the items in the list so that we as a team can talk about bullet 2 on the sad page or bullet 1 and 3 on the worry page.
  
You can go online and do a search for generic feelings like I did on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keyw…. Or do a search for a specific feeling. I recently ordered the book What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety (What to Do Guides for Kids)
 
Feelings book collage

 

 

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